The Secret’s in the Soup (Singapore)

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What the heck is this? Well it’s bak kut teh! Bak kut teh comes from the Chinese language dialect Hokkien and translates directly to ‘pork rib tea’. And did I mention that this restaurant (Song Fa Bak Kut Teh) was awarded a Michelin Bib for it?!

The pork rib tea is actually more of a soup, it’s made with tender pork ribs and a flavourful, peppery, spice-infusion (yep, secret spices, just like Coca Cola and KFC… you and I will never know…) which takes hours to prepare. This delicate yet flavourful soup is precisely what Song Fa has gained its Michelin recognition for (and you’ll never believe it, but there’s free refills on the soup!).

The soup aside, what can I say about how everything else tasted? Well the quality persists! The meats are carefully seasoned to give the dishes extra taste and dimension, perfectly complimenting and adding to the flavour of the soup (I sound like a food critic here … oh no… I’m really just a food lover… hehe… but seriously, a spoonful of meat with the soup is like H-E-A-V-E-N).

It was a 20-minute wait to be seated, and we went at what was considered a quite time (3pm) on a weekday! To feed four of us only costed about $55 AUD (remember: Michelin Bib recognises good food at an affordable price).

I’m signing off this post wishing I could swim in a hot tub of Song Fa’s bak kut teh (yes it was that good), Syn-Tek.

(Tl;dr? A pork soup broth sent from heaven.)

 

WHAT WE MUNCHED

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Pork Tenderloin Soup: The meat is tenderly delicious, you’ll just want to keep shoving more into your mouth!

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Pig’s Stomach soup: Despite the almost taboo nature of offal in some countries, this dish is a favourite loved by many who appreciate Bak Kut Teh, especially the older generations (like my dad!).

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Pork Ribs Soup: A traditional classic which must be ordered if you visit.

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Dough Fritters: Put these in your soup and they’ll soak up all the flavours; it’ll taste like an explosion of goodness in your mouth!

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Kai Lan: Also known as Chinese broccoli/kale. Lightly fried with a dressing of soy sauce and seasame oil.

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Lime Juice: Drinks in Singapore are generally extremely well priced, this refreshing beverage only set us back $1.80AUD.

 

‘PEEK-A-BOO’ OF THE PLACE

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Food blog, melbourne food, food blogger, melbourne, melbourne food blog, melbourne food consulting, food consulting, food consultants, social media consulting, social media consultants, singaporean food, travel blogger

Food blog, melbourne food, food blogger, melbourne, melbourne food blog, melbourne food consulting, food consulting, food consultants, social media consulting, social media consultants, singaporean food, travel blogger

Each table has a teapot heated on a mini-electric stove as well as a tap to refill water for the teapot from. Chinese tea is almost always accompanies a meal of bak kut teh.

 

 

 

 

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